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May 6, 2019

 

 

In 2017, suicide claimed the lives of more than 47,000 people in the United States, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Suicide affects people of all ages, genders, races, and ethnicities.

Suicide is complicated and tragic, but it can be preventable. Knowing the warning signs for suicide and how to get help can help save lives.

 

Here are 5 steps you can take to #BeThe1To help someone in emotional pain:

ASK: “Are you thinking about killing yourself?” It’s not an easy question but studies show that asking at-risk individuals ...

May 3, 2019

Each year millions of Americans face the reality of living with a mental illness. During May, NAMI and the rest of the country are raising awareness of mental health.

Each year they help fight stigma, provide support, educate the public and advocate for policies that support people with mental illness and their families. Learn more about the resources and information available to help promote Mental Health Awareness by clicking here

April 17, 2019

The first step, of course, is to decide whether cutting down or quitting is best for you. See these considerations and discuss different options with a doctor, a friend, or someone else you trust.

Thinking about cutting back? Here are some tips to try, small changes...

March 12, 2019

Ways to Improve Positivity 

How often do you feel thankful for the good things in your life? Studies suggest that making a habit of noticing what’s going well in your life could have health benefits.

Taking the time to feel gratitude may improve your emotional well-being by helping you cope with stress. Early research suggests that a daily practice of gratitude could affect the body, too. For example, one study found that gratitude was linked to fewer signs of heart disease.

The first step in any gratitude practice is to reflect on the good things that have happened in your life. These can be big or little things. It can be as simple...

February 8, 2019

Winter weather keeping you indoors? Enjoy cooking some heart-healthy comfort food to keep your hands busy and your belly full!

The National Institutes of Health, Heart, Lung and Blood Institute has a library of recipes featuring all kinds of meals. 

Search the full library, or check out some of the featured Soups and Stews below! 

  • Minestrone Soup
    A cholesterol-free version of this classic Italian vegetable soup—brimming with fiber-rich beans, peas, and carrots.

  • Corn Chowder
    Using low-fat milk instead of cream lowers the saturated fat content in this hearty dish.

  • Beef and Bean Chili
    Chili can be an easy and healthy option—this hearty recipe has just the right balance of flavors!

    ...
February 8, 2019

Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States. It is also a major cause of disability. There are many things that can raise your risk of heart disease. They are called risk factors. Some of them you cannot control, but there are many that you can control. Learning about them can lower your risk of heart disease.

What are the heart disease risk factors that I cannot change?

  • Age. Your risk of heart disease increases as you get older. Menage 45 and older and women age 55 and older have a greater risk.
     
  • Gender. Some risk factors may affect heart disease risk differently in women than in men. For example, estrogen provides women with some protection against heart disease, but diabetes raises the risk of heart disease more in women than in men.
     
  • Race or ethnicity. Certain groups have higher risks than others. African Americans are more likely than whites to have heart disease, while Hispanic Americans are less likely to have it. Some Asian groups, such as East Asians, have lower rates, but South Asians have higher rates.
     
  • Family history. You have a greater risk if you have a close family member who...

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